Common Diabetes Meds Tied to Complication Risk

Common Diabetes Meds Tied to Complication Risk


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Untreated, DKA can direct to loss of life, the ADA stated.

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The new examine provided far more than 200,000 folks with style 2 diabetic issues who started off utilizing SGLT2 inhibitors between 2013 and 2018. They were being when compared to a matched group of people today who took a unique class of diabetes prescription drugs called DPP-4 inhibitors.

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Throughout the study, 521 individuals had been identified with DKA.

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For persons getting SGLT2 inhibitors, the possibility of DKA was nearly 3 situations higher, the research found. And, possibility diverse with the type of SGLT2 inhibitor applied.

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Dapagliflozin (Farxiga) was linked to an 86% improve in DKA risk, although patients applying empagliflozin (Jardiance) had 2.5 moments the chance of DKA when compared to individuals on DPP-4s, the study discovered. Canagliflozin (Invokana) was linked with 3.6 moments larger odds of DKA.

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The fantastic information, having said that, is that you can choose methods to prevent DKA and get the rewards of SGLT2 inhibitors.

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Goyal explained the threat of DKA is highest when someone commences using an SGLT2 inhibitor. Being hydrated is a good way to assistance reduce it. It can be also essential to verify with your diabetic issues health care provider prior to taking any new medicines. And, discover out how often you need to check out your blood sugar concentrations.

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She said it’s also important to be conscious of the DKA signs and symptoms so you can find treatment with no delay if wanted.

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Signs consist of dry mouth, recurrent thirst and urination, tiredness, nausea and vomiting, problems concentrating and fruity-smelling breath, according to the ADA.

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Goyal stated SGLT2 inhibitors are a powerful and powerful course of medicines.

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“They truly enable with diabetes and heart failure, and can even enable with cardiovascular danger in men and women who really don’t yet have heart sickness,” she said. “These medications are truly superior for persons with kidney illness, also. And they’re easy. A person pill, as soon as a working day.”  

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Filion said all medicines have positive aspects and hazards that really should be brought to patients’ focus.

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“These drugs have been shown to lower blood glucose amounts and have advantages for the coronary heart and kidneys. They also have some hazards,” he said. “People and doctors need to discuss the positive aspects and challenges, specifically the danger factors for DKA.”

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The report was printed online July 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Another COVID Symptom Joins the List: Mouth Rash

Another COVID Symptom Joins the List: Mouth Rash


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By E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporter

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WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2020 (HealthDay Information) — When rashes on the pores and skin have extended been tied to COVID-19, medical professionals in Spain report that rashes on the within of the mouth are also occurring in some scenarios.

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The rashes are clinically regarded as enanthem, and it is not surprising that they are exhibiting up with COVID-19, claimed a U.S. skin doctor unconnected to the new analyze.

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“An enanthem is a rash [small spots] on the mucous membranes,” spelled out Dr. Michele Environmentally friendly, who practices at Lenox Hill Medical center in New York Town. “It is pretty popular in patients with viral bacterial infections like chickenpox and hand, foot and mouth disease. It is attribute of quite a few viral rashes to have an impact on mucous membranes.”

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The new Spanish study was printed July 15 in JAMA Dermatology. Scientists led by Dr. Juan Jimenez-Cauhe, of College Clinic Ramon y Cajal in Madrid, examined 21 patients diagnosed in early April with COVID-19 and related skin rashes.

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Of these individuals, 6 patients (29%) had enanthem on the inside of their mouths. The influenced individuals ranged in age from 40 to 69, the staff explained, and 4 of the 6 were being females.

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The mouth rash appeared any where from two times in advance of the onset of other COVID signs or symptoms to 24 days after, with an common time of about 12 times after onset of signs or symptoms.

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In most scenarios, the enanthem did not show up to be tied to any medications the clients ended up taking, further strengthening the idea that it was ailment with the new coronavirus causing the reddish places to appear.

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Just how widespread this symptom is with COVID-19 is nonetheless mysterious, given that “owing to protection fears, a lot of clients with suspected or verified COVID-19 do not have their oral cavity examined,” Jimenez-Cauhe’s team famous.

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Sources: Michele S. Environmentally friendly, M.D., skin doctor, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York CityJAMA Dermatology, July 15, 2020

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How Safe Is it to Use A Public Bathroom?

How Safe Is it to Use A Public Bathroom?


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July 2, 2020 — With filthy doorway handles, closely trafficked bathroom bowls, and proximity to strangers, public restrooms can be a germophobe’s worst nightmare. But the COVID-19 pandemic adds a new layer of hazard, and infectious sickness doctors are urging men and women to be careful ahead of the holiday getaway weekend.

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A modern review printed in Physics of Fluids outlines the opportunity risks of rest room plumes — clouds of droplets that can rise 3 toes from a flushing toilet and be inhaled by an unsuspecting user. Apart from the noticeable ick issue, simulations located that coronavirus remnants in a person’s stool can make their way on to other surfaces or linger in the air nearby.

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But there are factors men and women can do to steer clear of the hazards of restrooms.

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“What’s the most dangerous section of employing a general public restroom? It’s the people today in it,” suggests William Schaffner, MD, a professor of medication in the Division of Infectious Conditions at the Vanderbilt College University of Medicine. “It’s not essentially the inanimate atmosphere.”

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Dress in a mask, of study course. Scope out the bathroom ahead of time to see how congested it is, Schaffner states, and wait to use it until eventually it has cleared out a bit. If it is urgent, test to hold your distance from persons — for men, continue to be a pair of urinals away from the closest person. Goal to use larger sized restrooms to avoid close call with individuals and rest room sprays.

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However it could be tempting to use seat addresses, it is not advised — they could be protected with their possess germs, and it is smart to continue to keep get in touch with with objects to a minimum.

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“If you want, you can carry wipes into the bathroom with you and wipe off the rest room seat just before sitting down down,” Schaffner suggests.

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Bathrooms with lids can be shut ahead of flushing to avoid the plume. If they really do not have lids, back absent and exit the stall as swiftly as attainable. And when approaching the sink for hand-washing, Schaffner suggests, spend notice to the amount of people today already utilizing the space. If you can, wait around right up until the spot is clear.

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While experiments have shown that large-powered air dryers can blow dangerous particles all over, infectious sickness experts say individuals devices and paper towels have equivalent hazards. In fact, Schaffner says, the air dryers might be safer.

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“I believe air dryers enable instead than harm — they move air about,” he suggests. “If there comes about to be a person upcoming to you that is infected, the air dryer will disperse the air, and you’re a lot less probably to get an infectious dose of the virus.”

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In accordance to Aaron E. Glatt, MD, chairman of medication at Mount Sinai South Nassau, the danger of call with bodily fluids pales in comparison to the potential risks of shut gatherings. Following all, there is usually a chance of plume contamination with viruses and germs like E. coli.

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“Bodily fluids are usually a worry, regardless of COVID,” he claims.

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Glatt’s key tips? Be wise and use typical sense. If you are going on a vacation, test to stay away from using a general public restroom entirely and go ahead of you go away the home.

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The more substantial problem, Glatt suggests, is the likely spike of COVID-19 cases after fireworks displays and barbeques convey big teams of persons together.

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“People usually are not getting watchful. We are looking at it throughout the region appropriate now,” he suggests. “This is a components for disaster.”

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As extended as individuals are mindful of “the major three” — masks, hand-washing, and distancing — the state can stay clear of a put up-vacation spike, Schaffner suggests.

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“There is even now a good deal of space for folks to delight in on their own,” he states.

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Sources

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William Schaffner, MD, professor of drugs, Division of Infectious Conditions, Vanderbilt College School of Medicine.

 Aaron E. Glatt, MD, chairman of medication, Mount Sinai South Nassau.

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Journal of Applied Microbiology: “Evaluation of the potential for virus dispersal through hand drying: a comparison of three procedures.”

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Physics of Fluids: “Can a toilet advertise virus transmission? From a fluid dynamics standpoint.”

 

 

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COVID Spreads Quickly in Crowded Homes

COVID Spreads Quickly in Crowded Homes


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By Steven Reinberg&#13

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TUESDAY, June 23, 2020 (HealthDay Information) — Poverty and crowded dwelling situations improve the distribute of the coronavirus that results in COVID-19, a new review suggests.

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Scientists reached that summary immediately after tests just about 400 women of all ages who gave start at two hospitals in New York Metropolis in the course of the peak of the COVID-19 outbreak.

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“Our examine reveals that community socioeconomic position and residence crowding are strongly connected with possibility of infection. This could demonstrate why Black and Hispanic people residing in these neighborhoods are disproportionately at threat for contracting the virus,” researcher Dr. Alexander Melamed explained in a Columbia University news release.

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Melamed is an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Columbia’s University of Physicians and Surgeons in New York Metropolis.

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Particularly, Melamed’s crew researched the link between community characteristics and an infection with the virus that causes COVID-19.

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The investigators identified that girls living in neighborhoods with crowded homes were being a few moments additional most likely to be infected with the virus.

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Poverty was also a issue. Women of all ages residing in inadequate neighborhoods ended up twice as likely to be contaminated, though this discovering didn’t reach statistical importance simply because of the smaller sample size, the researchers mentioned.

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Population density, having said that, failed to engage in a part in the threat for infection, they famous.

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According to researcher Dr. Cynthia Gyamfi-Bannerman, “A person could feel that because New York Metropolis is so dense, you will find minor that can gradual the unfold of the virus, but our study suggests the chance of an infection is connected to house, instead than urban density.” Gyamfi-Bannerman is a professor of women’s health and fitness at Columbia.

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“For our expecting people, that may possibly signify counseling women about the hazard of an infection if they are looking at bringing in other household customers to assistance all through being pregnant or postpartum,” she claimed.

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Melamed additional that the results could assist general public health officers concentrate on preventive actions, these kinds of as distributing masks or culturally suitable educational facts, to the acceptable neighborhoods.

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The report was released on line June 18 in the Journal of the American Healthcare Affiliation.

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Source: Columbia College Irving Health-related Centre, news release, June 18, 2020

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June 11, 2020 — A roundup of the latest news about COVID-19

June 11, 2020 -- A roundup of the latest news about COVID-19


The U.S. now has more than 2 million confirmed cases — and we could see 200,000 deaths by fall. More than a dozen states are seeing spikes a few weeks after lifting restrictions. And educators, health experts, and politicians are trying to figure out what the next school year will look like. Here are the latest coronavirus headlines from around the world:

  • Worldwide we now have 7.4 million confirmed cases. More than 417,000 people have died and 3.48 million have recovered. Yesterday the U.S. passed the 2-million mark for confirmed cases. We’ve had almost 113,000 deaths so far, and an influential model cited by the White House issued a dire prediction, saying the country’s death toll could reach 169,890 by Oct. 1, with a possible range of about 133,000 to 290,000 deaths.

  • More than a dozen states are showing new highs in the number of positive coronavirus cases or hospitalizations, according to Washington Post data, a few weeks after lifting restrictions on most businesses and large gatherings. The spikes provide disturbing data points for the ongoing tug of war between federal, state, and local officials weighing the economic costs of restrictions meant to stop the spread of the virus with the human cost of lifting them. “When you look at states like Arizona and Texas, South Carolina, North Carolina — those are where the big outbreaks are right now; Florida to some degree seems to be going up — it’s not a second wave. They never really got rid of the first wave,” former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb said this morning.










  • Once lauded around the world for how it tackled the outbreak, South Korea is now counting dozens of new cases in a resurgence mostly concentrated around the capital where half of the nation’s 51 million people live. It’s a stark warning for the rest of the world. 

  • Paraguay’s coronavirus camps, obligatory for anyone entering the South American country, have garnered praise from international health bodies for helping stem the spread of the epidemic. Around 65% of Paraguay’s confirmed cases have been confined to the shelters, government data show, as the rest of the country has slowly reopened. But the isolation centers exact a heavy toll.






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Prostate Cancer Drug Could Be ‘Game Changing’

Prostate Cancer Drug Could Be 'Game Changing'


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FRIDAY, May possibly 29, 2020 (HealthDay Information) — For guys with sophisticated prostate most cancers, a new hormone remedy pill is effective much better than normal injections — and carries a substantially decrease chance of heart attack or stroke, a scientific trial has discovered.

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The drug, termed relugolix, is not but permitted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. If it gets the inexperienced light, on the other hand, it would be “sport-changing,” mentioned Dr. Neal Shore, lead researcher on the trial.

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Hormone remedy has long been a regular treatment for superior prostate most cancers — which include conditions the place the tumor has distribute past the prostate gland or recurred following procedure with surgical procedure or radiation.

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The objective is to suppress androgen hormones, including testosterone, mainly because they gas the progress of prostate tumors.

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Correct now, that’s generally performed with injection drugs referred to as LHRH agonists. The trouble is that the prescription drugs originally trigger a surge in testosterone, in advance of dramatically slicing stages of the hormone. That surge can cause cancer-linked symptoms, this kind of as bone pain and urinary complications, to flare.

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“It truly is like possessing a race and telling folks to to start with take 10 ways back, and then get started running,” said Shore, medical director of the Carolina Urologic Study Heart in Myrtle Beach, S.C.

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In contrast, relugolix — taken as a everyday pill — fast lowers testosterone levels, the demo found.

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Even much more importantly, Shore reported, it had a reduced threat of cardiovascular “occasions” — outlined as a heart attack, stroke or demise from any trigger.

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Above 48 weeks, that risk was 54% lower between guys specified relugolix, as opposed to a standard LHRH agonist termed leuprolide.

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“That is pretty substantial,” explained Dr. William Cance, chief health care and scientific officer for the American Cancer Culture.

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“This drug quite significantly checks all the bins,” claimed Cance, who was not involved in the study.

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Additional exploration is wanted on the medication’s lengthy-term efficiency, he observed. But if it can be permitted, Cance stated, it would very likely be favored about LHRH agonists.

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The conclusions are being released in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), and concurrently documented Friday at the virtual once-a-year meeting of the American Culture of Scientific Oncology.

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FDA Test Warning, ‘Warp Speed’ Vaccine Project

FDA Test Warning, 'Warp Speed' Vaccine Project


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What your doctor is looking through on Medscape.com:&#13

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May perhaps 15, 2020 — Here are the coronavirus stories Medscape’s editors all around the globe think you require to know about now: 

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Food and drug administration Warning on Precision of Abbott ID NOW Quick Take a look at&#13

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Preliminary knowledge propose that Abbott Labs’ ID NOW immediate take a look at for COVID-19, reportedly in use to screen White Property team, may possibly give phony-negative outcomes, the US Meals and Drug Administration (Fda) said in an inform late Thursday.

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To day, the Fda has acquired 15 adverse celebration stories about the Abbott ID NOW examination that advise some customers are receiving inaccurate negative success, the company said, and some scientific tests have recognized accuracy issues with the exam. The agency is investigating no matter whether this could be due to the sorts of swabs or viral transportation media utilised.

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“This check can nevertheless be employed and can the right way establish many constructive instances in minutes. Detrimental benefits might need to have to be confirmed with a significant-sensitivity licensed molecular test,” an Fda formal explained in the notify assertion.

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Particulars on ‘Operation Warp Speed’ Vaccine Challenge&#13

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Less than an initiative called “Procedure Warp Pace,” a group of federal officers, scientists, and drug providers have the problem of acquiring a coronavirus vaccine by the close of the 12 months.

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The workforce contains leaders from the Centers for Ailment Handle and Prevention, the Fda, the Countrywide Institutes of Overall health, the Section of Wellbeing and Human Companies (HHS), and the Division of Protection. President Donald Trump discussed details of the initiative during a push briefing Friday afternoon. 

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Public health and fitness gurus have predicted that a coronavirus vaccine could choose 12 to 24 months to deliver. Operation Warp Speed’s target is to minimize that timeline by concurrently planning the production and distribution procedures so drug organizations can fill vaccine vials at the time the system is all set. Less than the directive, orders were being positioned this week for vaccine-associated supplies like glass vials, needles, and syringes, reported Alex Azar, HHS Secretary.

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Keep-at-Dwelling Orders Correlated With Slower Spread&#13

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Two reports recommend that authorities stay-at-dwelling orders have had a sizeable effect on slowing the unfold of COVID-19. A person located a considerable big difference in the progress of COVID-19 situations involving border counties in Illinois, which has a remain-at-house buy, and Iowa, which does not. A different calculated how much shelter-in-place orders have lowered the distribute of the virus compared with other social distancing measures. 

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Stroke in Young Adults, Test Safety Issues

Stroke in Young Adults, Test Safety Issues



What your doctor is reading on Medscape.com:

APRIL 25, 2020 — Here are the coronavirus stories Medscape’s editors around the globe think you need to know about today: 



Stroke in Young Adults

Investigators from Mount Sinai Health System in New York City report five cases of large-vessel stroke over a 2-week period in COVID-19 patients under age 50 years — a sevenfold increase over the norm.

The cases, which involved only mild or no COVID-19 symptoms, are described in a rapid communication to be published online April 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

“It’s been surprising to learn that the virus appears to cause disease through a process of blood clotting,” lead investigator Thomas Oxley, MD, PhD, told Medscape Medical Newsadding that the message for neurologists and other physicians is “we’re learning that this can disproportionally affect large vessels more than small vessels in terms of presentation of stroke.”


Abbott Test Safety Issues?

Lab workers at Abbott Laboratories are raising alarm bells about the safety of a widely distributed rapid coronavirus test touted repeatedly by President Donald Trump. They are concerned in particular about the risk of infection of those handling the test, saying the test requires more than the usual protection for those who administer it.

Kaiser Health News reports on this and other “hiccups” with respect to the test, as well as plans to develop safety recommendations to address the issues.


Bud Rose

Burton “Bud” Rose, MD, renowned kidney specialist, entrepreneur, and creator of the popular online medical education resource UpToDate, died Friday from complications of COVID-19 at age 77. You can read more about his achievements and invaluable contributions in this moving tribute to “the Steve Jobs of medicine” on Stat News.


VTE vs Bleeding Risk

Clinicians have been sounding the alarm about unusually high rates of thrombosis among COVID-19 patients, and news this week that Broadway star Nick Cordera had one of his legs amputated as a result of thrombotic complications of COVID-19 brought the issue center stage.

Now a panel of 36 international experts has published a report summarizing the evidence on the thrombotic disease pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management in patients with COVID-19 as well as the management of thrombotic disease in patients without COVID-19. The panel also addresses concerns about balancing the need for thromboprophylaxis against the risk for bleeding.


Continued

“There’s so much confusion, so much heterogeneity in the way people are practicing — and granted, the evidence is not perfect — but I thought it’s about time to provide a thorough assessment of the known literature but also some consensus-based recommendations,” Behnood Bikdeli, MD, New York–Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Irving Medical Center and Yale University’s Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, New Haven, Connecticut told theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology.


Immunity Passports?

As part of efforts to enable people to travel or return to work, some governments have floated the idea of providing “immunity passports” indicating an individual is COVID-19 risk-free.

Not so fast, says the World Health Organization (WHO), which has published guidance on adjusting public health and social measures for the next phase of the pandemic response. The WHO states there is currently no evidence that people who have recovered from COVID-19 and have antibodies are protected from a subsequent infection.

In a scientific brief published online April 24, the WHO states that study on this matter is ongoing, but at this point evidence is lacking about the effectiveness of antibody-mediated immunity to ensure that an individual is risk-free, and that the use of such classifications could increase the risks of continued virus transmission.


US WHO?

The United States will have no official role in a new WHO initiative involving several world leaders and designed to accelerate the development of tests, drugs, and vaccines against the coronavirus.

The Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator initiative, a “landmark collaboration” that aims to speed tool development and ensure equal access worldwide, was announced Friday in the wake of a decision by President Trump to suspend US contributions to the global health body, as reported by The Hill. A spokesman for the US mission in Geneva said there will be no official US participation.


Managing Hypoxia

In hypoxic patients with COVID-19 and an indication for endotracheal intubation, an airway expert should perform intubation, an N-95/FFP-2 or equivalent respirator mask should be used, and other PPE and infection control precautions should be taken, according to new guidelines from the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.


Continued

Staff presence in the room should be minimized and use of videolaryngoscopy should be considered if available, the authors note.

Medscape Drugs and Diseases has provided a quick summary of the guidelines, which also address patients in whom endotracheal intubation is not indicated and who are not tolerating supplemental oxygen or high-flow nasal cannula use.


In Memoriam

As frontline healthcare workers care for patients with COVID-19, they commit themselves to difficult, draining work and put themselves at risk of infection. More than 500 throughout the world have died. 

Medscape has published a memorial list to commemorate them. We will continue updating this list as, sadly, needed. Please help us ensure this list is complete by submitting names with an age, profession or specialty, and location through this form. 



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Saliva COVID Test Alternative to Deep Nasal Swab

Saliva COVID Test Alternative to Deep Nasal Swab


By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, April 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Testing for the COVID-19 coronavirus can be an unpleasant affair, with a doctor or nurse shoving a cotton swab deep into your nasal cavity to get a good sample.

But results that are just as accurate can be obtained from a more easily acquired saliva sample, a new Yale study reports.

Saliva samples taken from just inside the mouth were more accurate and consistent than deep nasal swabs taken from 44 patients and 98 health care workers, the researchers reported.

For instance, saliva samples detected the coronavirus in two health care workers without symptoms who’d previously been cleared by a deep nasal swab, the Yale researchers said.

“We found it performs as well as, and in a number of cases better, than the nasopharyngeal swab,” said lead researcher Anne Wyllie, an associate research scientist at the Yale School of Public Health in New Haven, Conn. “We have another very viable option.”

The findings were published April 22 on medRxiv, a preprint server for emerging research.

Switching to saliva testing would have many advantages over taking deep nasal samples, Wyllie said.

Saliva testing requires far fewer materials, and thus would be more immune to the supply chain problems that have hampered efforts to expand COVID-19 testing through deep nasal swabs, Wyllie said.

“There wouldn’t be a shortage of things to collect the saliva sample in, because there are so many options that are possible,” Wyllie said, adding that any collection cup or container could be reused after it’s been disinfected.

Health care workers also would need to wear less personal protective equipment when taking a saliva sample compared with a nasopharyngeal swab, Wyllie said.

Nasopharyngeal testing involves inserting a swab deep into the nose, into the region of the pharynx. The swab is then rotated to collect secretion before it’s yanked out and sent off to a lab.

“Taking the swab itself can cause patients to sneeze or cough, which carries a lot of risk to the health care workers,” Wyllie said.


Continued

Saliva tests also could be easily adapted for rapid home testing, Wyllie added, noting that most people would be hard-pressed to shove a swab deep enough into their own noses to get a good sample.

“I can’t imagine reliably doing that to myself,” Wyllie said of performing a self-swab.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave emergency use authorization on April 13 for a saliva-based test for COVID-19 developed by researchers at RUCDR Infinite Biologics, a Rutgers University-backed group. The approved test must be conducted in a health care setting under supervision of a qualified professional.

Wyllie noted that a number of other research teams are also testing the reliability and accuracy of saliva testing, and coming up with good results.

Some places already are moving toward saliva testing.

Jill Taylor, director of the New York State Public Health Department’s Wadsworth Center, said her institution might switch to a combined light nasal swab and saliva test instead of deep nasopharyngeal swabbing, based on an in-house study they conducted.

A swab run around the inside of the nose combined with a saliva test would only miss 5% of positive COVID-19 cases, compared with 2% missed by nasopharyngeal swab testing, the New York researchers found in a study of 226 specimens.

“The [nasopharyngeal] swab was clearly the best sample, but the nasal swab and saliva were quite good also,” Taylor said. “So, at the moment we are looking at combining a nasal swab and saliva so that compared to the nasopharyngeal we would be close to the sensitivity.”

Wyllie believes that saliva testing will become the standard for COVID-19 testing in the future, particularly given the need for quick testing as the United States and other nations start to emerge from lockdown.

“It’s going to take a lot of pressure off different aspects of supply chains. It’s going to be so much quicker and easier to get saliva samples. I really think this is going to be the way forward,” Wyllie said.



WebMD News from HealthDay


Sources

SOURCES: Anne Wyllie, Ph.D., associate research scientist, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Conn.; Jill Taylor, Ph.D., director,  Wadsworth Center, New York State Public Health Department; April 22, 2020, medRxiv, online




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Will a Jolt of Java Get Your Creative Juices Flowing?

Will a Jolt of Java Get Your Creative Juices Flowing?


By Robert Preidt
HealthDay Reporter

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MONDAY, March 9, 2020 (HealthDay Information) — Your early morning cup of espresso might support your emphasis and challenge-fixing competencies, but it will not kick-commence your creative imagination, a new study claims.

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“In Western cultures, caffeine is stereotypically involved with resourceful occupations and existence, from writers and their espresso to programmers and their electrical power drinks, and there’s a lot more than a kernel of reality to these stereotypes,” claimed research first writer Darya Zabelina, an assistant professor of psychology at the College of Arkansas.

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Amplified alertness, heightened vigilance, increased concentration and improved motor functionality are recognised to be linked with caffeine, but its effects on creative imagination is considerably less identified, Zabelina mentioned.

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She and her colleagues assessed the effects of caffeine on 80 volunteers’ convergent and divergent contemplating, doing work memory and mood. Convergent contemplating is applied in trouble-resolving though divergent pondering is utilized in creativeness.

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Volunteers were provided possibly a 200 milligram (mg) caffeine capsule — equal to a single cup of potent espresso — or a placebo. Caffeine improved convergent imagining but experienced no serious impression on divergent wondering.

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Researchers also located that caffeine didn’t significantly have an affect on doing work memory, but it appeared to have an impact on mood — those who took it described feeling fewer unhappy, in accordance to the review in the March difficulty of the journal Consciousness and Cognition.

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“The 200 mg [of caffeine] enhanced dilemma-solving substantially, but had no outcome on artistic considering,” Zabelina mentioned in a college news launch. “It also didn’t make it worse, so continue to keep drinking your espresso it won’t interfere with these qualities.”

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Resource: College of Arkansas, information launch, March 5, 2020

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